Languages in Contact: The Partial Restructuring of Vernaculars


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The Linguistics of English

Informed by the first systematic comparison of the social and linguistic facts in the development of these languages, this book will be welcomed by students of contact linguistics, sociolinguistics and anthropology.

1st Edition

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Contact languages: Critical concepts in language studies. Edited by John Holm & Susanne Michaelis

Condition: Used: Good. Language: English. Brand new Book. There is widespread agreement that certain non-Creole language varieties are structurally quite different from the European languages out of which they grew; however, until recently, linguists have found difficulty in accounting for either their genesis or their synchronic structure.

Towards a Continuous Model of Contact-Induced Change

Mufwene c has written that. The problem with this honorable concern is that all social scientists, tosome degree, work by setting the reality of other peoples lives withina framework and a vocabulary that is particular to a discipline; it is in-evitably a question of power, but it is also how analysis becomes possible. To refuse that task is to refuse the science.


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Not every Englishman is gladto know he speaks a Germanic language; but the classification has itsuses, even if it reflects the German origins of historical philology. Noteveryone knows what a clitic and a copula are, but these are termsof art which linguists need to analyze language. And the disenfranchisingof a language, and of its speakers, may have more to do with economicand political issues than the choices of labels made by social scientists faraway. Still, Kautsch and Schneider are certainly correct in their assertion thatTerms such as semi-creoles.

Linguists do indeedhave a duty to be sensitive to such questions. But these questions maybe exceedingly complex, and relative. Many creole-speaking areas arenow independent countries where creole-speakers themselves control themedia, and to that extent the local use of words; most of them seem to findthe term creole to have positive connotations. Some do not, particularlyin some areas where partially restructured languages are spoken. Few words are truly neutral. The term Geechee sometimes used in ref-erence to Gullah can have undesirable connotations in African AmericanEnglish, i.

In fact, the American Dialect Dictionary defines Geechee as a negro fromthe islands, as from the Bahamas Wentworth , while for Bahami-ans, A Geechee is what you could call a Merican whos work field Holm with Shilling And therein lies the analogy: a descriptiveword will carry the burden of attitudes to those it describes, and come intime to be identified with those attitudes.

LINGUIST List 15.1690

Whatever terms linguists may. For all these reasons, I have decided to refer to semi-creoles as par-tially restructured languages, although I will continue to refer to creolesas such, rather than as fully restructured languages.


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My logic is thatlinguists still need to distinguish creoles from other fully restructuredlanguages, such as those that are intertwined partially intertwined lan-guages having never, to my knowledge, been reported. There may besome loss of precision here, since I am not convinced that the processeswhich produced the languages discussed in this volume are in all pointsthe same as those which produced partially restructured language vari-eties such as Irish English Hickey forthcoming, pace Winford It is also true that the languages examined here share at least part of theirsubstrate with the Atlantic creoles, which means that they also share tovarying degrees a broader cultural heritage.

Long and Short Words: Language Typology

The more neutral term doesnot convey this cultural difference. But it may be that this cultural andhistorical difference is why some find the term semi-creole unacceptable. I believe that my choice of terms is not euphemistic; that is, it is notan attempt to deny historical realities, like the social position of slaves,in order to make the world seem more tasteful or untroubling than itactually is.

Holm, John A.

Thus I will continue to use one term with which linguists havedeveloped the most surprising problems: the world creole itself. Creole is a term of art for linguists, as is creolization; we try to giveit a precise meaning in order to analyze and understand a particular kindof language contact and change. It must clearly be something beyondthe obviously circular definition: the process which produces a creolelanguage. We think we mean something like McWhorters pithy defini-tion: radical reduction by non-natives followed by reconstitution into anatural language , but the problems begin as soon as we tryto explain how and why this happens.

It does sometimes seem that weare more interested in debating the general processes even before we haveprovided a proper account of the specifics involved, but this failing maybe understandable if not forgivable: there are so many creole languagesand they appear to have been produced by such a wide range of socialand linguistic circumstances that it often seems unclear precisely what acreole language is, much less what the processes are that produce such alanguage.

This has led to a singularly unhelpful confusion. Parkvall has written that for most creolists, there is nothing at all that sets creolesapart from non-creoles. If this is so, it has to do with the belief that. Holm, John [en] - Languages in Contact. Post on Sep 25 views. Category: Documents 11 download. Informedby the first systematic comparison of the social and linguistic facts inthe development of these languages, this book argues that the transmissionof their source languages from native to non-native speakers led topartial restructuring, resulting in the retention of a substantial amountof the source languages morphosyntax, but also the introduction of asignificant number of substrate and interlanguage features.

ISBN eBook EBL ISBN hardback Cambridge University Press has no responsibility for the persistence or accuracy ofs for external or third-party internet websites referred to in this book, and does notguarantee that any content on such websites is, or will remain, accurate or appropriate. The study of partially restructured vernaculars 1Introduction 1 1. Social factors in partial restructuring 24Introduction 24 2. The verb phrase 72Introduction 72 3. The noun phrase 92Introduction 92 4.

Languages in Contact: The Partial Restructuring of Vernaculars Languages in Contact: The Partial Restructuring of Vernaculars
Languages in Contact: The Partial Restructuring of Vernaculars Languages in Contact: The Partial Restructuring of Vernaculars
Languages in Contact: The Partial Restructuring of Vernaculars Languages in Contact: The Partial Restructuring of Vernaculars
Languages in Contact: The Partial Restructuring of Vernaculars Languages in Contact: The Partial Restructuring of Vernaculars
Languages in Contact: The Partial Restructuring of Vernaculars Languages in Contact: The Partial Restructuring of Vernaculars
Languages in Contact: The Partial Restructuring of Vernaculars Languages in Contact: The Partial Restructuring of Vernaculars

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